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WVDP safely relocates high integrity containers

Photo Submitted Using the 100-ton crane inside the Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility, crews lift the HIC and its interior concrete shield from its exterior carbon steel shield and onto a flatbed trailer. The exterior shield was then lifted and placed on the trailer next to the HIC.

Photo Submitted
Using the 100-ton crane inside the Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility, crews lift the HIC and its interior concrete shield from its exterior carbon steel shield and onto a flatbed trailer. The exterior shield was then lifted and placed on the trailer next to the HIC.

EM and its cleanup contractor CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC (CHBWV) recently completed the relocation of two 69,000-pound High-Integrity Containers (HIC) from their location inside the Fuel Receiving and Storage (FRS) facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project.
Each HIC, which includes a 14-inch thick inner concrete shield and a two-inch thick exterior carbon steel shield, was relocated from the FRS decontamination pit to a secure outside storage area. Each HIC contained filtering materials used in the FRS water treatment system.
“This accomplishment allows the continuation of the FRS deactivation,” said DOE-WVDP Director Bryan Bower. “By performing this work now, we can use our highly-skilled workforce to further reduce legacy risks.”
A tractor with a low-boy trailer (very low deck to carry tall loads) was backed into the FRS. Using the inside 100-ton crane, each HIC and its exterior shield were moved from the decontamination pit onto the trailer.
Once the HICs were secured, the trailer was driven out of the FRS in parallel to a 200-ton mobile crane. Each HIC was safely and deliberately lifted from the trailer and placed in its new location.
“Our team continues to use their combined knowledge to safely and deliberately complete high-risk work activities,” CHBWV President Scott Anderson said. “I’m proud of their efforts, accomplishments, and in the work, they continue to do on this project.”
The FRS was historically used to receive and store spent nuclear fuel during fuel reprocessing operations from 1966 to 1972.
This work scope, which includes the HIC relocation and the removal of asbestos-containing material, was recently added to the current contract to further prepare the facility for future demolition.

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